Tag Archives: the verge

The Internet: Chopped & Screwed

A few years ago the Internet was introduced as a dial-up service, and it was an irrelevant tool that very few people had access to. Today, the Internet has become a requirement for communication and is accessible on any device in many places around the world. Corporate self-indulgence and the government has allowed the Internet to go from vibrant center of the new economy to burgeoning tool of economic control. Companies such as AT&T and Comcast have announced early this year that they plan to close and control the Internet through additional fees. The Verge expresses four simple ideas as to why the Internet is f**ked: 1) the Internet is a utility, 2) there is no real competition to provide Internet, 3) all Internet providers should be treated equally, and 4) the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) needs to play a more effective role.

The Internet can be considered a utility, just like water and electricity. The difference between an electricity  bill and the Internet is that the Internet offers web-hosting solutions and search screens as evidence that they’re actually providing information. There is no need for fancy words or extra charges, Internet access is a utility that should get faster and cheaper over time for customers. Instead, Comcast customers pay extra against their data caps when streaming video on their Xboxes using Microsoft’s services.

There is no real competition to provide Internet service as it’s either cable broadband from a cable provider or DSL from a telephone provider. Since DSL isn’t nearly as fast as cable, and the cable companies are aggressive in bundling TV and Internet packages together, there’s really only one choice. On the other hand, the uses of cell phones have improved tremendously, because tech companies such as Apple, Google, and Samsung all had to fight it out and make better products in order to profit and build cliental. This is an example of  real competition. Without out any competition of course people will have no choice but to pay for certain fees for satisfactory Internet service. Continue reading