Social Media Afterlife

Source: themarysue.com

Source: themarysue.com

As the age of technology grows older, more of us face the question: what do we do with a person’s social media accounts when they’ve passed away? Many families and friends choose to continue to post pictures and memories on the person’s wall in order to help keep their memory alive. However, Facebook has made it possible for people to request to memorialize an account so it is impossible to login. As a form of closure, the person’s Facebook wall becomes a sort of memorial, collecting all the thoughts of friends and family. Although it’s a bit morbid and slightly haunting, DeadSocial allows one to create a message or a series of messages through various social media sites that will only become published after they’ve passed away. The site states that its purpose is to allow people “to say goodbye in their own time and their own unique way.” Although this may be jarring in the wake of mourning, it’s also quite startling when a dead friend or family member starts liking pages on Facebook. However, this is just a sad reminder of how little control we have over our social network data. Companies will continue to use our information to make money even after we die. To learn more about social media in the Afterlife, check out Readwrite’s article here.

11 Elements Every Blog Post Needs

Source: Copyblogger.com

Source: Copyblogger.com

The allure of my headline is the fact that it declares there are things every blog post needs and the fact that you don’t know them motivates you to read further. To survive and thrive in the blogosphere, bloggers must hone their skills and commit to their craft. Their voice needs to be persuasive, their language seductive. Blog posts need to provide something for the reader – a laugh, a tip, a piece of anecdotal advice. If they’re not beneficial, they won’t be read.

Every post needs to leave their readers wanting more, obsessively checking for the next entry. And don’t underestimate the power in the simplicity of a bulleted list. The easier it is for readers to digest, the more likely it will be consumed. Check out the incredibly cool infographic in its entirety by Copyblogger here.

Tech Skills Ruled 2013

As the presence of companies grows online, they are constantly looking for web developers with the skills to get the job done. Although preference in development software varies, there was a significant spike in searches for a particular set of skills. According to Stack Overflow’s statistics, a culmination of frequently searched keywords by companies to find job applicants, Java was the #1 searched skill keyword. Taking a look at the infographic below, out of the top ten searched developer skills of 2013 Java took first place by a solid 10%. Even development abilities in iOS and Android aren’t preferred nearly as much. Despite this, knowledge in Java is relevant for the development of Android systems. Regardless, technological skills, especially web development, are highly valuable in the ever-growing World Wide Web. Read more about skills that are in-demand at Readwrite’s article here.

Source: Readwrite

Source: Readwrite

Snapchat is hacked, there is much flack

Source: Readwrite

Source: Readwrite

Although the popular social app was hacked earlier this month, Snapchat has received much criticism for their blasé response to the security breach. “Our team continues to make improvements to the Snapchat service to prevent future attempts to abuse our API.” Only after more than four million Snapchat phone numbers were published by an anonymous hacker did Snapchat respond to the potential hack alerts. The app’s choice of action was to announce that they would fix the Find Friends feature that supposedly allowed the hack in the first place. For more on this story, visit Readwrite’s article here.

Is Netflix threatening movie theaters?

Source: thenextweb.com

Source: thenextweb.com

Whether you’re part of the majority that have given in and bought Netflix accounts or you’re the one standing alone in the movie theater left to watch the glory of films on the old-fashioned big screen by yourself – in both cases, you’re not alone. The film industry has feared that the rise of video distribution sites such as Netflix would damage film attendance; however, the number of moviegoers has only decreased slightly over the past few years and ticket sales have been fairly consistent (although the rise of ticket prices has yet to slow down). The real threat to the cinema is home entertainment.

Nowadays, it’s so easy to access movies and TV shows with the click of your remote. Through platforms such as Comcast Xfinity, Apple TV, and HBO, there’s no longer any need to wait in line or choose a movie time or pay way too much for a bucket of popcorn. Movies are available (most of the time cheaper than at the theater) to view from the comfort of your own home. The convenience of a home theater is not the only draw though, Adam Leipzig, former Senior VP of Walt Disney Studios, explained that the competitiveness also has to do with the quality between content. “The best writing and the best character development is generally happening on Web series, or television series… [better] than we see in most studio movies.” So, just how will these new technologies at home affect the movies? Read more on thenextweb here.

Which Texting App Do You Use?

Do you text more then you talk on the phone? If that’s the case you’re probably already using instant messaging chat apps. Lifehacker provides five best alternative texting apps. Instant messaging on chat apps, such as Viber and WhatsApp, has overtaken the traditional SMS text message. These apps are all here to send a message to whomever wherever they may be, but they all have different features that suit diverse users. Take a second and learn about five free popular texting apps and download the one that does the job you want.

‘Tikker’ tells you how many days you have left to live

Do you have a hard time feeling motivated? Is it tough to get out of your bed in the morning? Maybe you should invest in the Tikker. It’s what sci-fi movies have been promising for years: knowing the exact day you’ll die, down to the last second. It’s an approximation of course, but it’s based on whatever health information you provide (so if you lie, you’re only cheating yourself). Although this sounds incredibly morbid, it’s supposed to be extremely motivating. By knowing how much time you have left, you should be able to live more freely and live each day how you want rather than wasting time on what you don’t. On Tikker’s Kickstarter page, the creators say, “If you know that time is ending, you make every second count.”

“It’s not how much time you have, it’s what you do with it.” As you can see, the creators have taken a more positive spin on this chilling concept. By using your time on this earth more productively and fulfilling your own dreams and aspirations, happiness will be well within your grasp. Tikker is exactly what you need to be as productive as you can be! If you need something to kick your butt in gear, there’s nothing more persuasive than a timer strapped to your wrist that’s counting down the seconds left in your life. Oh, and it also tells the time. Check out more about Tikker at The Verge.

How Digital Technology Changes Meaning Making

In this piece on Edutopia, Betty Ray introduces us to Douglas Rushkoff’s book Present Shock through an interview with him on the state of technology and education. As Ray writes, Rushkoff “turns his lens to the human experience in a world that’s always on, always connected, always in the now, now, now.”

Ray asks Rushkoff, “How did digital technology “break” this narrative?” Rushkoff answers, “Well, initially, it was the remote control… We can pause, go back and forward. The storyteller no longer calls all the shots.” This is an interesting perspective, one that challenges traditional notions of narrative by acknowledging the agency of the audience in the construction and reception of the message.

Neither Ray nor Rushkoff understand this breaking of narrative as a bad thing, more as a new understanding for considering how students construct meaning. Rushkoff says, “They are no longer required to submit to the official story in order to get the information they want.” In other words, digital technology’s capacity to break the narrative creates new paths to knowledge for students.

For more from Rushkoff, check out his appearance on The Colbert Report.