Control Your Facebook and Twitter History

As you read this blog post, there may be someone Googling information about you. What do you want them to find? That is why it’s important to clear your browsing history. Molly Wood shares a video and explains how to download and delete activity on Facebook and Twitter.

Before you begin to clean your Facebook and Twitter history, take a moment and see where you stand. If you’re concerned, Molly has some advice in the NY Times on how to take control your browsing history.

Trending: World Cup

Once many Professional Writing students realize that managing social media outlets can be a tangible form of making a living, thinking about becoming an adult doesn’t seem so scary. We spend a lot of time (probably more than we’re willing to admit) perusing Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other sites, absorbing and posting information. Judging by what’s trending, social media users have the ability to find, learn, and promulgate popular events; and according to Forbes Magazine, the greatest influx of social media attention is on the horizon.

We’re talking Futbol, people. Soccer. That ninety minute game played with a ball with a zebra color scheme. As soccer transcends sport to become a worldwide cultural phenomenon, one can expect the social media platforms to be inundated with updates, hashtags, and stories.

So, look alive, social media socialites! Pay attention to the trends; this is an interesting event that only happens once every four years, and social media is at its peak of popularity. Sure, your Pintrest might be blown up with images of soccer players and their fanatic followers, but it’s a nice change of pace from wedding pictures and overused memes.

Storify: Simplified

Storify is a social media platform with the goal of telling stories or narratives through other social media posts. With a layout that’s a hybrid of Facebook and Pinterest, this platform is quickly gaining an audience with social media “storytellers”. Storify is probably most commonly used in articles to report on events that are heavily discussed or covered through social media. By using direct links to specific tweets, Facebook posts, Google+ posts, YouTube videos, Instagram or Flickr photos, and other outside sources, Storify restructures and condenses these posts into a congruent newsfeed that then tells a story.

Screen Shot 2014-04-20 at 2.33.38 PM

Each post requires a title and description, but the body of the story is up to you. In the sidebar, choose the social media tab you wish to pull posts from, and then you can either search by a keyword or user to find what you’re looking for. To input specific posts, use the link tab and paste the direct link of the specific post you’re looking for, the posts will be generated in the sidebar. Drag-and-drop posts from the sidebar and simply click between posts in the story feed to slip titles or captions into the narrative.

One flaw that I found was in importing posts from Facebook. I wanted to add comments from a post on a Facebook page. Every time I pasted the link, the post didn’t generate correctly and the body of the post didn’t even show up. By reaching out to Storify on Twitter (@storifyhelp), I figured out that I had to download the Storify extension on my Chrome browser. This allowed me to right click on the comment and say “Add to Storify” and the post showed up in My Collection under the Storify tab in the sidebar.

Overall, Storify is a brilliant site that bridges the gaps between social media platforms and helps us tell our stories through the new, digital short form that is today’s writing.

10 Free Infographic Tools

Source: Creative Bloq

Source: Creative Bloq

Sometimes, it just isn’t feasible to create a graphic from scratch on Photoshop or InDesign. We simply don’t have enough hours in the day. That’s where easy-to-use infographic websites, such as Creative Bloq’s Ten Free Tools for Creating Infographics come in handy to speed up the process. For the simplest, easy-to-use option, Easel.ly or Venngage have premade templates, themes, and icons to choose from. If you’re looking to share and connect with other designers, Visual.ly would be your best bet. If you’re a Windows user, Get About allows you to track and record social media activity and creates infographics with the results. From visualize.me’s revolutionary infographic resumes to Piktochart’s easily customizable infographic templates, there’s a free alternative for any infographic project you can dream up. Explore your options at Creative Bloq.

Best of Twitter 2013

Twitter Glossary

NYmag.com

I could start this by stating that Twitter is an incredible micro-blogging site that has revolutionized social networks and connected the world in a global conversation like never before – but I’d be stating the obvious. The truth is, Twitter is one weird place. Sure, it’s just one of the more popular corners of the Internet to hang out, but, not doubt, it inspires some odd behavior. Round up all the humans with internet access, give them 140 characters to state their opinions and the ability to read and respond to almost anybody else’s opinion, and we’ve got ourselves a straight up verbal rampage on our hands. Should be fun.

Let’s look back on the most popular Twitter trends of 2013. There are the more well known entities that you couldn’t escape if you tried such as Horse ebooks or Doge. (So done, much annoying.) And then there are the obscure such as Twitter canoes or subtweeting (The overuse of mentions and the blatant disregard of them so people don’t know they’re being talked about.). Some of these may not have reached you in your corner of the Twitter-verse because – let’s face it – Twitter is huge and some conversations don’t quite circulate far enough. One thing’s for sure: there’s no end to these trends. As long as Twitter lives, grows, and changes, so will its users and the rhetoric they use. Check out NYMag’s 2013 Twitter Glossary for more trends.

Hack, a new programming language by Facebook

Hacklang.org

Hacklang.org

Last Thursday, Facebook revealed its latest achievement, Hack, a new programming language. When Facebook was created ten years ago, it was coded entirely in PHP. However, as Facebook became bigger, the language became harder to manage and developers were more susceptible to making mistakes. The manager of Facebook’s Hack team, Bryan O’Sullivan, helped eliminate those errors by creating Hack. The website has moved almost all of its code over to Hack in the last year. The company released an open-source version of the language for the public last week.

As an open-source programming language, Hack was designed to allow developers to write bug-free code fast. By keeping some elements of PHP and combining the structure of other programming languages, Hack was born. In order to debug code more efficiently, instead of checking while the program is running, which is what PHP does, Hack will check for errors ahead of time, which is called static typing. The language itself is most similar to PHP; O’Sullivan encourages programmers that want to use Hack to only convert the parts of their code that are the most important, as it is not necessary to redo everything. This blending of both static and dynamic typing forms a method called “gradual typing” which has been shown to provide swift feedback and incredible accuracy.

Read more about this new language at ReadWrite.