From Creative Bloq: Design Your Own Typeface!

Courtesy of creativebloq.com

Ever wanted to create your own typeface, but you’re not exactly sure where to start? Creative Bloq helps you design your own typeface in eighteen steps. Some tips include figuring out some choices you have to make first: do you want sans serif or serif typeface? How will it look in long documents versus larger font? Also, don’t be afraid to “use your hands.” Draw it out before making it more precise digitally. That way you can see exactly what you want it to look like before it’s on the screen. The article also gives tips on what software to use and why it’s not just about the letters “A-Z.”

Read all the tips here.

From Open Culture: A Simpler Way to Interpret Information

Because of the immense amount of information and data in this digital age, new ways of presenting and organizing information have developed in the past few years. This has been dubbed, “data visualization.” A new PBS series has turned attention to this form of presenting information, exploring how good design – from “scientific visualization to pop infographics – is more important than ever. The goal of creating information we can visualize is to help designers – and even those without a mind for design – conceptualize what they’re looking at and interpreting. The overall message to take from the video is: the simpler the better.

 

Source: Open Culture

From Brain Pickings: The Story of a Cover Girl

Brain Pickings recently featured an article about the book, Lolita – The Story of a Cover Girl: Vladimir Nabokov’s Novel in Art and Design, which is a compilation of the different covers of one of literature’s most controversial classics: Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. They describe the different colors and subjects each artist took to create the varying covers and how they incorporated that with the varying interpretation of the theme.

“Lolita is about obsession and narcissistic appetite, misogyny and contemptuous rejection, not only of women, but of humanity itself. And yet. It is also about love; if it were not, the book would not be so heart-stoppingly beautiful.”

Check out more of the covers and read excerpts from the book.

From The Verge: University of California wants to let you read all its peer-reviewed work

Starting November 1st, all peer-reviewed work published by scholars working within The University of California system will be available for free on the university’s eScholarship website. This is a big move toward open access publishing, and comes in the wake of Aaron Swartz’s death as he was on trial for “illegally” attempting to do exactly what UC is starting. An interesting caveat to this move is that scholars can opt-out on a per paper basis. Read more at The Verge.