• yellow_Road_Header2
  • WORDCLOUD
  • 415_header
  • dive in graphic - iceberg with face overlay

Ellen Cushman Receives the CIC-ALP Fellowship

by | Posted May 5th, 2011

Every year, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) sponsors the Academic Leadership program. The Big 10 Universities (plus the University of Chicago) select Leadership Fellows to participate in the program. Michigan State University selects six faculty members, and this year Ellen Cushman, WRAC associate professor, received one of the six.

The purpose of the fellowship is to develop faculty leaders who are knowledgeable about Michigan State and the issues that face education (budget cuts, changing student populations, increasing pressures from external sources). The fellowship gives faculty an introduction to the university beyond their college (for Ellen, beyond the College of Arts & Letters). During the next year, Ellen will be meeting with the other six faculty who have received fellowships and with university administrators.  The MSU fellows will also travel to Indiana University, University of Chicago, and Penn State for meetings of all the CIC-ALP Fellows from all the CIC institutions.

The department congratulates Ellen on her selection.

WRAC Faculty and Students Honored

by | Posted April 25th, 2011

Spring brings a whole slew of teaching and faculty awards to WRAC.

Phill Alexander (pictured right), a graduate teaching assistant for WRAC and a PhD student in the Rhetoric & Writing program, received the 2011 AT&T Faculty Award in Instructional Technology. He won the award for creating a content management system for his WRA 210: Introduction to Web Authoring course.

According to the awards committee, the award is a response “to the growing use of online technologies for instruction at Michigan State University,” and is meant “to both recognize and encourage best practices in the use of technology to enhance teaching and learning.”

Alexander received one of the awards this year because he eliminated ANGEL from his classroom. While he agrees that ANGEL is an impressive content management system, he felt that a more editable and personal system would be conducive to his teaching style–so he created one. Using WordPress, Alexander developed a content management system that allows his students to review course materials, link to pertinent information, and share personal blogs and social media accounts (though the last feature is optional).

Using this system Alexander taught a course that was “100% in person, 90% online,” as he describes it.

Professor Jeff Charnley (pictured left) won the 2011 Fintz Award for Teaching Excellence in the Arts and Humanities for his extensive and innovative coverage of wartime literature, memoirs, paintings, sculpture, and music in his IAH 231B: War, Moral Issues and Efforts to Limit or End Wars course.

In using his military experience and vast historical knowledge of war-time art and human responses, Professor Charnley is not only able to make topical connections to societal war response, to the experiences of the artists, and to the necessity for this art. Professor Charnley received raving reviews from many of his students, who were deeply interested and moved by the course curriculum.

The Fintz Award is a prestigious award; it intends to “honor teachers for distinguished practice and to encourage others to follow their examples,” according to Kirk S. Kidwell, director of the awards committee.

According to the committee, “In a field of very distinguished candidates for the Fintz award for IAH 211-241 courses, Professor Jeffrey Charnley impressed [us] with the innovation, creativity and rigor of his course, as well as the extraordinary responses of students to his teaching.”

Dr. Danielle DeVoss (pictured right) received the 2011 College of Arts and Letters Faculty Leadership Award for her consistently excellent service to the college.

The award, initiated in 2007, recognizes a CAL faculty member who has provided exemplary service to the college, and who has served as a leader in thinking, doing, and making across college initiatives.

DeVoss helped to launch the Digital Humanities Specialization in CAL; she has coordinated and run website focus groups for the college in 2007; she has served as a CAL URI mentor for several semesters. She also coordinated a CAL Faculty Community on Experiential Learning in 2009, and she has offered more than a dozen workshops for faculty and students in the past year, reaching an MSU audience of more than 2,000 people.

According to the awards committee, “this award seeks to recognize, honor and reward the kind of leadership that embraces collaboration and joint deliberation, facilitates active and deliberate problem-solving, and engages in goal-setting, and consensus development.”

While the pool of submissions was extremely competitive–a testament to the excellence the College of Arts and Letters contributes to higher education–DeVoss’s “nomination was the most deserving of this recognition.”

Special congratulations go to Alexander, Charnley, and DeVoss for their outstanding work.

WRAC Faculty and Students Honored

by | Posted April 25th, 2011

Spring brings a whole slew of teaching and faculty awards to WRAC.

Phill Alexander (pictured right), a graduate teaching assistant for WRAC and a PhD student in the Rhetoric & Writing program, received the 2011 AT&T Faculty Award in Instructional Technology. He won the award for creating a content management system for his WRA 210: Introduction to Web Authoring course.

According to the awards committee, the award is a response “to the growing use of online technologies for instruction at Michigan State University,” and is meant “to both recognize and encourage best practices in the use of technology to enhance teaching and learning.”

Alexander received one of the awards this year because he eliminated ANGEL from his classroom. While he agrees that ANGEL is an impressive content management system, he felt that a more editable and personal system would be conducive to his teaching style–so he created one. Using WordPress, Alexander developed a content management system that allows his students to review course materials, link to pertinent information, and share personal blogs and social media accounts (though the last feature is optional).

Using this system Alexander taught a course that was “100% in person, 90% online,” as he describes it.

Professor Jeff Charnley (pictured left) won the 2011 Fintz Award for Teaching Excellence in the Arts and Humanities for his extensive and innovative coverage of wartime literature, memoirs, paintings, sculpture, and music in his IAH 231B: War, Moral Issues and Efforts to Limit or End Wars course.

In using his military experience and vast historical knowledge of war-time art and human responses, Professor Charnley is not only able to make topical connections to societal war response, to the experiences of the artists, and to the necessity for this art. Professor Charnley received raving reviews from many of his students, who were deeply interested and moved by the course curriculum.

The Fintz Award is a prestigious award; it intends to “honor teachers for distinguished practice and to encourage others to follow their examples,” according to Kirk S. Kidwell, director of the awards committee.

According to the committee, “In a field of very distinguished candidates for the Fintz award for IAH 211-241 courses, Professor Jeffrey Charnley impressed [us] with the innovation, creativity and rigor of his course, as well as the extraordinary responses of students to his teaching.”

Dr. Danielle DeVoss (pictured right) received the 2011 College of Arts and Letters Faculty Leadership Award for her consistently excellent service to the college.

The award, initiated in 2007, recognizes a CAL faculty member who has provided exemplary service to the college, and who has served as a leader in thinking, doing, and making across college initiatives.

DeVoss helped to launch the Digital Humanities Specialization in CAL; she has coordinated and run website focus groups for the college in 2007; she has served as a CAL URI mentor for several semesters. She also coordinated a CAL Faculty Community on Experiential Learning in 2009, and she has offered more than a dozen workshops for faculty and students in the past year, reaching an MSU audience of more than 2,000 people.

According to the awards committee, “this award seeks to recognize, honor and reward the kind of leadership that embraces collaboration and joint deliberation, facilitates active and deliberate problem-solving, and engages in goal-setting, and consensus development.”

While the pool of submissions was extremely competitive–a testament to the excellence the College of Arts and Letters contributes to higher education–DeVoss’s “nomination was the most deserving of this recognition.”

Special congratulations go to Alexander, Charnley, and DeVoss for their outstanding work.

Fiction 440: Flash Fiction in Greater Lansing

by | Posted April 21st, 2011

Fiction 440: It’s flash fiction–complete works of fiction in 440 words or less–and it’s here in Lansing. No excerpts, no poetry, no exceptions. You get a prompt, you write the story, and you present it to an audience at a local watering hole.

Fiction 440 is relatively new. It is the brainchild of Aaron Matthews, an attorney heavily involved in the Lansing community and a friend of Jeff Grabill. Jeff says Aaron “was on a plane reading the in-flight magazine, and it had an article about flash fiction. He thought that this was a great idea and perfect for Lansing as part of the larger project to make the area more culturally innovative and engaging. He brought the idea to me, Ivy Hughes, and Suban Nur Cooley (both local writers), and we decided to make it happen.”

Why is Fiction 440 so amazing? Grabill explains that it’s low-impact, meaning it doesn’t take much to plan and execute the events. Additionally, it’s easy to access. As Jeff says, all it takes is “the desire to write, and a little courage.” And finally, there is a wide range of people who can enjoy andattend. Gathering “creative, engaging people together leads to positive outcomes for the community that exceed the sheer entertainment value of a flash fiction event.”

The atmosphere at Fiction 440 is amiable, comfortable, and full of people laughing, talking, loudly applauding, and cheering. It’s a no-judgment zone, and those who read their stories seemed at ease. There was a story about how life is like a John Hughes movie, a story about meeting Sting and following him back to his hotel, a story about a couple whose marriage is saved by dancing the Waltz, and a story about a groupie and her love for music(ians).

Fiction 440 is a great place to wind down, to meet up with friends, and to listen to touching, funny, and just plain good stories. Submit or don’t submit; you should come regardless.

Check out the website and come to the next Fiction 440. The prompt: include the words Ireland, flip-flop, and virgin in your story. Submit on the website. We hope to see you there!

Seeking Communication Management Interns

by | Posted April 19th, 2011

WRAC has been very fortunate to have three outstanding interns for the past several months who have been steadily growing and cultivating our online community. Dan Nufer, Noelle Sciarini, and Vanessa Levin-Pompetzki are the department’s second group of Communications Management Interns and they have done outstanding work maintaining and expanding WRAC’s presence on the web and in social networks. Unfortunately for us, Dan and Vanessa will be moving on after this semester, so the search is on for someone to fill their very big shoes for summer and fall. They still have some time left this semester, so Dan, Noelle, and Vanessa took a moment to talk about the internship, what it entails and what they’re taking away from it:

 

 

If you’re interested in being one of the WRAC Communications Management Interns for summer or fall 2011, or just want more information, contact Laura Julier (julier@msu.edu). Complete details about the position are available below.

(more…)

Summer Seminar in Rhetoric & Composition 2011

by | Posted April 19th, 2011

The Summer Seminar in Rhetoric & Composition will be held at MSU the week of June 5-10, 2011. The SSRC focuses on contemporary movements in composition pedagogies and practices in ways that allow participants to apply these ideas at their home institutions, according to SSRC director, Nancy DeJoy. To this end, the program includes both formal presentations and workshop sessions facilitated by prominent scholars who represent a variety of approaches and issues.

Purdue University’s Patricia Sullivan will offer the keynote address on Sunday June 5, at 7 PM in Snyder-Phillips RCAH Auditorium. The talk is free and open to the public. Participants may register for a single workshop or the entire week, and this year, graduate credit for Composition Pedagogies is available. More information can be found here.