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Going for It: Writers’ Bloc Reminds Students of the Importance of Internships

by | Posted October 8th, 2011

Brianne Ross & Polonius Photo by Kristel Klank

Writers’ Bloc kicked off the season, on October 7th, with an internship panel consisting of five PW seniors who were willing to talk and answer questions about their various internships.

Noelle Sciarini discussed her stint as a WRAC communications management intern, which provided her with the skills to get her next internship at Impression 5. Lauren Ebelt was able to intern with three different publishing companies in Dublin, Ireland, where she discovered the true enjoyment she gets from working at a publishing house.

Olivia Asiala currently interns at the RCAH Poetry Center and focuses on its communication strategy using the skills she gained from a previous internship. Ashley Haglund interned at Johnson Controls as a technical intern and was able to learn what she does and doesn’t like when it comes to a job environment. Mike Kulick currently works at Avalon International Breads in its sales division and is helping to better develop their online presence.

The bottom line? Internships help students network and create valuable experiences. The PW seniors’ best advice is to apply for any job that will provide the experience students need and that will help them decide what they are suited for in a future career.

Writers’ Bloc rounded off the afternoon with their kick-off party. Missed this exciting and informative networking event? Stay posted to catch the next one!

Going for It: Writers’ Bloc Reminds Students of the Importance of Internships

by | Posted October 8th, 2011

Brianne Ross & Polonius Photo by Kristel Klank

Writers’ Bloc kicked off the season, on October 7th, with an internship panel consisting of five PW seniors who were willing to talk and answer questions about their various internships.

Noelle Sciarini discussed her stint as a WRAC communications management intern, which provided her with the skills to get her next internship at Impression 5. Lauren Ebelt was able to intern with three different publishing companies in Dublin, Ireland, where she discovered the true enjoyment she gets from working at a publishing house.

Olivia Asiala currently interns at the RCAH Poetry Center and focuses on its communication strategy using the skills she gained from a previous internship. Ashley Haglund interned at Johnson Controls as a technical intern and was able to learn what she does and doesn’t like when it comes to a job environment. Mike Kulick currently works at Avalon International Breads in its sales division and is helping to better develop their online presence.

The bottom line? Internships help students network and create valuable experiences. The PW seniors’ best advice is to apply for any job that will provide the experience students need and that will help them decide what they are suited for in a future career.

Writers’ Bloc rounded off the afternoon with their kick-off party. Missed this exciting and informative networking event? Stay posted to catch the next one!

WRAC Faculty Profiles: Kate Fedewa, Carol Quinn, & Kathryn Houghton

by | Posted October 6th, 2011

Kate Fedewa

Photo by Kate Fedewa

MSU alumna and area-native Kate Fedewa said she “couldn’t wait to return home” to Michigan after finishing her education but certainly didn’t realize she would be returning to MSU classrooms as well.

Fedewa, who is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was hired by WRAC to instruct first-year writing, but it seems it was more than the comforts of home that drew her back. Fedewa’s deep love of teaching and the diversity of the MSU student body was what really spoke to her. “I love teaching, and it’s a lot of fun working with students here since they come from a variety of backgrounds,” she said. “I learn a lot from my students, and hopefully they learn a lot from me, too.”

Fedewa’s research focuses on the history of rhetoric and the development of English literacy in medieval England. She earned three bachelors degrees from MSU in 2007 and is looking to complete her dissertation by the year’s end.

 

Photo by Carol Quinn

Carol Quinn

Far from her Queens, New York, home, assistant professor Carol Quinn comes to MSU as a teacher and fiction writer.

Quinn was hired by WRAC in July to teach first-year writing and loves working with MSU students, saying: “They have a less preconceived idea of what to say and how to say it. They say what they feel, and I love that.”

Quinn holds an M.F.A. from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a B.A. from New York University. She is currently teaching two sections of WRA 150 Evolution of American Thought. Before coming to MSU, Quinn taught at Temple University and wrote at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Quinn is also currently working on her first novel.

 

Kathryn Houghton

Photo by Kristel Klank

A 2008 Professional Writing alumna herself, newly hired assistant professor Kathryn Houghton says, “It’s nothing short of wonderful to once again be part of the MSU community.”

After receiving her M.F.A. in creative writing from Eastern Washington University in 2010, Houghton returned to Lansing to work for the Michigan Department of Education as a writing and editing contractor before signing on to teach first-year writing this semester, plus a course for the PW program next semester.

“I love the feeling of sharing knowledge and helping students see things in new and different ways,” Houghton says of teaching. She also loves the idea of giving back to the Professional Writing program, and seeing how it has grown: “There are so many cool new courses I wish I could take.”

In her spare time, Houghton is a fiction-writer (with a completed novel sitting in a drawer at home), is teaching herself French, and loves everything soccer. Her research focuses on gender studies, the craft of fiction, social media, and digital copyright.

WRAC Faculty Profiles: Kate Fedewa, Carol Quinn, & Kathryn Houghton

by | Posted October 6th, 2011

Kate Fedewa

Photo by Kate Fedewa

MSU alumna and area-native Kate Fedewa said she “couldn’t wait to return home” to Michigan after finishing her education but certainly didn’t realize she would be returning to MSU classrooms as well.

Fedewa, who is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was hired by WRAC to instruct first-year writing, but it seems it was more than the comforts of home that drew her back. Fedewa’s deep love of teaching and the diversity of the MSU student body was what really spoke to her. “I love teaching, and it’s a lot of fun working with students here since they come from a variety of backgrounds,” she said. “I learn a lot from my students, and hopefully they learn a lot from me, too.”

Fedewa’s research focuses on the history of rhetoric and the development of English literacy in medieval England. She earned three bachelors degrees from MSU in 2007 and is looking to complete her dissertation by the year’s end.

 

Photo by Carol Quinn

Carol Quinn

Far from her Queens, New York, home, assistant professor Carol Quinn comes to MSU as a teacher and fiction writer.

Quinn was hired by WRAC in July to teach first-year writing and loves working with MSU students, saying: “They have a less preconceived idea of what to say and how to say it. They say what they feel, and I love that.”

Quinn holds an M.F.A. from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a B.A. from New York University. She is currently teaching two sections of WRA 150 Evolution of American Thought. Before coming to MSU, Quinn taught at Temple University and wrote at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Quinn is also currently working on her first novel.

 

Kathryn Houghton

Photo by Kristel Klank

A 2008 Professional Writing alumna herself, newly hired assistant professor Kathryn Houghton says, “It’s nothing short of wonderful to once again be part of the MSU community.”

After receiving her M.F.A. in creative writing from Eastern Washington University in 2010, Houghton returned to Lansing to work for the Michigan Department of Education as a writing and editing contractor before signing on to teach first-year writing this semester, plus a course for the PW program next semester.

“I love the feeling of sharing knowledge and helping students see things in new and different ways,” Houghton says of teaching. She also loves the idea of giving back to the Professional Writing program, and seeing how it has grown: “There are so many cool new courses I wish I could take.”

In her spare time, Houghton is a fiction-writer (with a completed novel sitting in a drawer at home), is teaching herself French, and loves everything soccer. Her research focuses on gender studies, the craft of fiction, social media, and digital copyright.

PW Alums Work with MSU Physicists on “Relics of the Big Bang”

by | Posted October 5th, 2011

Newly-minted PW grads David Johnson and Bethany Tomaszewski just completed work on “Relics of the Big Bang,an original, full-length planetarium show produced by MSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy.

The show emphasizes research currently underway at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN), the world’s largest particle physics laboratory. Funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, the show’s purpose is to entertain and inform audiences about cutting edge research in physics, including experiments with dark matter and Higgs particles.

Tomaszewski and Johnson played key roles in the writing and editing of the script, which involved taking complex scientific concepts and making them exciting to a broad audience. “Negotiating the meaning of abstract, intangible concepts is difficult,” Tomaszewski says. “We worked very hard with the physicists to ensure that the content of the show is accurate, specific, digestible, and logical.”

The two PWers also served the project as videographers, conducting several of the interviews which appear in the show; they even developed interview questions and helped edit the video. Once publicity efforts got underway, they wrote media releases, helped develop Twitter, Facebook and website content, and created video for use on social feeds.

“Bethany and David signed on to the project to work on the script, but by the end of it they were doing just about every job in the professional writing arsenal,” says Jonathan Ritz, the PW faculty member who put them in touch with the film’s producers and provided some mentoring along the way. “These tasks kept coming up and David and Bethany kept saying, ‘Hey, we can do that for you.’”

Johnson especially appreciated the opportunity to work closely with such a diverse group of people. “The most interesting part was seeing how all the various disciplines came together to create something of this magnitude. We worked with physicists, a cyclotron expert, astronomers, the Abrams Planetarium coordinator, a team of animators, a sound expert, narrators, and an editing adviser. It was a great project.”

“Relics of the Big Bang” premieres 8:00 p.m. on Friday, October 7 at Abrams Planetarium. If you can’t make it Friday, the show will run regularly every Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and every Sunday at 4 p.m throughout the semester.

The show’s producer/directors are Dr. Reinhard Schweinhorst, an assistant professor in MSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Brad Schoenrock, a graduate student in that department.

PW Alums Work with MSU Physicists on “Relics of the Big Bang”

by | Posted October 5th, 2011

Newly-minted PW grads David Johnson and Bethany Tomaszewski just completed work on “Relics of the Big Bang,an original, full-length planetarium show produced by MSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy.

The show emphasizes research currently underway at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN), the world’s largest particle physics laboratory. Funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, the show’s purpose is to entertain and inform audiences about cutting edge research in physics, including experiments with dark matter and Higgs particles.

Tomaszewski and Johnson played key roles in the writing and editing of the script, which involved taking complex scientific concepts and making them exciting to a broad audience. “Negotiating the meaning of abstract, intangible concepts is difficult,” Tomaszewski says. “We worked very hard with the physicists to ensure that the content of the show is accurate, specific, digestible, and logical.”

The two PWers also served the project as videographers, conducting several of the interviews which appear in the show; they even developed interview questions and helped edit the video. Once publicity efforts got underway, they wrote media releases, helped develop Twitter, Facebook and website content, and created video for use on social feeds.

“Bethany and David signed on to the project to work on the script, but by the end of it they were doing just about every job in the professional writing arsenal,” says Jonathan Ritz, the PW faculty member who put them in touch with the film’s producers and provided some mentoring along the way. “These tasks kept coming up and David and Bethany kept saying, ‘Hey, we can do that for you.’”

Johnson especially appreciated the opportunity to work closely with such a diverse group of people. “The most interesting part was seeing how all the various disciplines came together to create something of this magnitude. We worked with physicists, a cyclotron expert, astronomers, the Abrams Planetarium coordinator, a team of animators, a sound expert, narrators, and an editing adviser. It was a great project.”

“Relics of the Big Bang” premieres 8:00 p.m. on Friday, October 7 at Abrams Planetarium. If you can’t make it Friday, the show will run regularly every Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and every Sunday at 4 p.m throughout the semester.

The show’s producer/directors are Dr. Reinhard Schweinhorst, an assistant professor in MSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Brad Schoenrock, a graduate student in that department.

Conversations in Cultural Rhetorics: A Brown Bag Series

by | Posted October 4th, 2011

Conversations in Cultural Rhetorics
A Brown Bag Workshop Series

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26TH
1 – 3 p.m.
MSU WRITING CENTER, 300 BESSEY HALL

Anyone interested in Cultural Rhetorics is invited!
This workshop will:
o Share ideas about cultural rhetorics theories and methodologies
o Suggest ways to collaborate on projects grounded in cultural rhetorics
o Build a network of faculty and students doing cultural rhetorics work

Featured speakers include:
o Dr. Malea Powell, Associate Professor, WRAC
o Daisy Levy, Doctoral Candidate, WRAC
o Donnie Johnson Sackey, Doctoral Candidate, WRAC
o Jennifer Sano-Franchini, Doctoral Candidate, WRAC

Want more information?
Contact: Madhu Narayan (narayanm@msu.edu) or
Andrea Riley-Mukavetz (rileyan1@msu.edu)

Conversations in Cultural Rhetorics: A Brown Bag Series

by | Posted October 4th, 2011

Conversations in Cultural Rhetorics
A Brown Bag Workshop Series

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26TH
1 – 3 p.m.
MSU WRITING CENTER, 300 BESSEY HALL

Anyone interested in Cultural Rhetorics is invited!
This workshop will:
o Share ideas about cultural rhetorics theories and methodologies
o Suggest ways to collaborate on projects grounded in cultural rhetorics
o Build a network of faculty and students doing cultural rhetorics work

Featured speakers include:
o Dr. Malea Powell, Associate Professor, WRAC
o Daisy Levy, Doctoral Candidate, WRAC
o Donnie Johnson Sackey, Doctoral Candidate, WRAC
o Jennifer Sano-Franchini, Doctoral Candidate, WRAC

Want more information?
Contact: Madhu Narayan (narayanm@msu.edu) or
Andrea Riley-Mukavetz (rileyan1@msu.edu)