From Lifehacker: “5 Best Paper Notebooks”

 

Image from LifeHacker
Image from LifeHacker

Who knew there were so many different kinds of notebooks? I’ve actually written down a few names so I can go shopping later… Whether you’re a Moleskin fanatic or a bit nostalgic for the composition notebook, every writer is looking for the right notebook. Your preferences definitely depend on the where and how of your writing. If you tend to enjoy writing outside rain or shine, you’re probably not going to keep your composition notebook for very much longer. If you have a habit of writing with whatever you can get your hands on, Moleskin notebooks can handle almost anything. Take a gander at Lifehacker’s list and find the best pick for you.

10 Crucial Tips for Web Designing

Less is more but simple is hard. Designing for the web can be the most rewarding activity, creating an interactive interface that many people will use – but it can also be the most tedious. There are a lot of things to consider before you start spinning your threads to create your website. The most important one is you can’t know everything. No designer knows everything. You know those programming geniuses on routine cop shows that know every possible route and there’s nothing that they can’t do? Wrong. Nobody is really like that. Designing for the web is about learning what tools work best for you and taking it day by day. Every project is going to be different: varying audiences, content, contexts, and reasons you’re doing this project. You’ll learn the most by doing – so go create! But first, you should probably read more about the things you need to know about designing for the web at Treehouse Blog.

Typewriters aren’t just for the nostalgic anymore

Image from swintec.com
Image from swintec.com

Not only can you still obtain a typewriter, but you can also get a specially-made, retro, see-through typewriter. Now you’ll be the epitome of hipster chic when you saunter into the nearest coffee shop with this gem in tow. As the number of typewriter manufacturers dwindles, companies like Swintec of Bridgewater, New Jersey must look for creative sources of income when it comes to where they sell their typewriters. Thankfully, prisons are ever weary of the tools they give to their inmates. A clear typewriter lowers the chances of contraband finding its way into the facility. Read more about the new audience for typewriters at The Verge.

From The Atlantic: “Y U No Go Viral: The Emerging Science of Memes”

Memes and science. You never saw this one coming did you? There is, in fact, a science to trending memes. After becoming insanely sidetracked by meme websites such as Quickmeme and Cheezburger, I finally read The Atlantic’s article on the science of memes.

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“Relationship between the probability of retweeting a message and its similarity to the user’s interests, inferred from prior posting behavior.” (Weng et al.)

Scientists have found that memes act like genes where they ‘reproduce’ as they spread through a population and ‘mutate’ as they are interpreted differently by people. Research from Harvard University by Michele Coscia suggested that rather than memes that were shared a lot in a short period of time, memes that were shared on a consistent basis over a long period of time were more likely to reach the ‘success’ threshold.

Even more interesting, nowadays for a meme to rise to popularity another meme must “pass into obscurity”. These ‘more competitive’ memes were found to be more successful in the meme world overall. However, they also discovered that not only do certain memes rise in popularity “clusters”, but also “affinity groups rule the web”. This means that the more that meme lines up with someone’s interests, the more likely they are to share it. This is very obvious. But look they made graphs, it’s all professional and stuff.

Souce: Michele Coscia
Souce: Michele Coscia

While there is still no conclusive evidence to suggest why a certain thing will go viral, I believe it’s gotta have funny. That’s it. Mystery solved. If you want to read more about memes and where the heck the name ‘meme’ came from anyway, look no further than The Atlantic. Y U no click?! CLICK.