SoundCloud pairs with Instagram to encourage users to create their own album artwork

Source: The Verge
Source: The Verge

As a perfect square shape, Instagram pictures are the ideal fit for album artwork. This is what CEO of SoundCloud thought too because last week he announced a partnership with Instagram. “We’re the largest audio platform and they’re the largest photo platform. It’s cool to tie them together,” said Alex Ljung, CEO of SoundCloud . Users will now be able to upload their Instagram pictures as album artwork on SoundCloud. This new development is awesome – unless all your Instagram pictures consist of food. However, then you could literally make a meatloaf album artwork for your Meatloaf Greatest Hits album. Read more about this artsy partnership at The Verge.

 

The UN’s new International Asteroid Warning Group

If you’re like me, you’ve had intense daydreams about asteroids plummeting towards Earth and knocking it off its orbit sending our little blue planet into an inevitable spiral towards the sun and consequently, you’ll never be able to live out your life. Or maybe you haven’t. Perhaps, I watch too much Doctor Who.

Regardless, the Earth now has its own Doctor Who-like authority in the new International Asteroid Warning Group. Yes, it’s exactly what it sounds like. In the wake of the Chelyabinsk meteor in Russia earlier this year, the United Nations took the advice from the Association of Space Explorers (ASE) to go ahead and create this group. In the event that there should be a killer asteroid heading towards Earth, the Warning Group will notify the UN’s Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space who will then launch a missile to knock the asteroid off its course.

Supposedly, the Earth has had a few close calls including an asteroid the size of the Golden Gate Bridge. (I’m convinced one of the members of the Warning Group is the Doctor and you can’t convince me otherwise.) Personally, I’m surprised a larger asteroid hasn’t hit us before. It could just be dumb luck, but I’m glad we have some people thinking about the important things because if we didn’t have this group, to use the words of ex-astronaut Ed Lu, that would be “stupidity”. Catch up on this important development at The Verge.

Source: science.howstuffworks.com, Andreus Agency
Source: science.howstuffworks.com, Andreus Agency

The SKOR Codex: A digital time capsule for the future

Source: The Verge
Source: The Verge

Hundreds of years from now, our digital data will have vanished or become lost in translation under multiple new software systems and technology. A codex was created to make sure that doesn’t happen. A collective of artists in the Netherlands, La Société, created The SKOR Codex, a book that holds digital data in binary code. Encoded within the 1’s and 0’s are sound recordings, images, and diagrams of today’s technology, trends, and cultures; the simplest of these being pictures of bikes, desks, and fax machines. As a result, eight copies of the codex are currently being made, one of them was already given to the creator of the World Wide Web himself, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, and another will live at the Open Data Institute in London. Each copy is built to last for 1,000 years, a time capsule of modern times for the future. Don’t get too excited, Americans, the codex focuses mostly on European culture and the SKOR itself. Check out more about this exciting technology at The Verge.

160 characters – 1 chance to define yourself

Social media has been asking us to define ourselves from moment one with profiles, photos, and “about me” sections. Twitter is unique in that it limits the user to 160 characters – a generous 20 more than the usual 140 for a tweet.

This limit has informed the way twitter bios are written and one particular style has risen to the top. The 160 characters are usually utilized to give a rapid-fire listing of personal traits and titles. Student. Journalist. Coffee addict. And the succinct style is not just for teenagers and famous rappers. Hillary Clinton uses it to great effect.

So what does your twitter bio say? Are you more of a Tom Hanks (self effacing) or a Taylor Swift (subtly self promotional)? Read more on the subject at the New York Times.