Beautiful and Free Vintage Posters

I’m a sucker for vintage poster design, particularly old circus posters. Freevintageposters.com offers a collection of posters you’re welcome to download and print. The categories include something for just about everyone, for example: Advertising, Travel, Food Drink, Movies Theater, Circus Magic, Art Design, Sports, and more. Here are a few of my favs:

PiratePad: Online Collaborative Writing Space

PiratePad is a web-based collaborative writing tool, much like Google Docs. However, PiratePad doesn’t require a google account to use. I think too often we turn to Google for a collaborative writing space without considering the myriad of reasons some folks may not (choose to) have a google account (privacy, age, access speed, etc.). PiratePad offers a free, robust, open-access alternative.

A few of PiratePad’s unique features are the availability of multiple languages (hundreds!), the option to choose a license (including Creative Commons), and a “time slider” that allows the play back of revisions.

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Instructify.com: Reviews of Free Teaching Tools for Teachers by Teachers

Instructify.com is chock full of reviews and links to free resources for instructors. While the main demographic seems to be K-12 instructors, there are certainly tools here for college writing courses. The site is a bit clunky and silo-y, but the resources reviewed here are incredibly useful. With close to 1,500 posts there is surely something here for everyone.

I am particularly drawn to the “writing” tag (of course) – instructify.com/tag/writing. This tag features reviews of gems like Let Them Sing it For You, comic strip creators, Vintage Technology, and more. Remember, all the tools and resources featured on Instructify are free.

Open Access Online Feminist Journals, curated by HASTAC scholars

hastac_logoYou’re going to want to bookmark this post, or at least bookmark the resource – A free list of free online peer-reviewed feminist journals. Shoutout to HASTAC scholar Lori Beth De Hertogh and post commenters for putting the list together.

Many of the journals listed here are relevant to rhetoric and writing – Harlot; Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology; and The Fibreculture Journal: Digital Media + Networks + Transdisciplinary Critique, to name a few. In addition to considering this list for publication potential, also consider the use of these feminist journals in your scholarship and classrooms.

Tiki-Toki: Online Timeline Creation Tool

Tiki-Toki is a free web-based timeline creator. But what does that mean exactly? The timelines you can create with Tiki-Toki move across the screen left to right, allowing the user to embed images, audio, video, and text. What I love most about this tool is the visual design elements that allow for the creation of beautiful timelines. And as we know, the visual rhetoric of a piece can make or break its effectiveness and credibility.

The newest feature Tiki-Toki offers is 3D, which allows your timeline to move front to back while time still moves left to right. Sounds confusing with mere words, so have a look at this history of the Tower of London – tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/137152/Tower-of-London-3D.

Ready to get started? Check out the timeline Tiki-Toki created that walks you through its features while telling you the history of the tool – tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/43/Beautiful-web-based-timeline-software/#vars!date=2010-11-11_13:15:40!.

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Introducing the WRAC Communications Team

Now that you’ve been reading our work, we think it’s about time we introduced ourselves.

Shewonda Leger is a writer who has love for creativity, whether its fiction or non-fiction. She is a graduate student at Michigan State University, pursuing her master’s degree in Digital Rhetoric and Professional Writing. When she is not at home in her pajamas working on her novel, she is writing for WRAC or consulting at The Writing Center @ MSU. Follow her on Twitter @Mz_Poesy.

Haley Erb is a junior in the Professional Writing program. She also studies creative writing and the digital humanities. She is a pro-oxford comma and an excellent marshmallow roaster. Willing to ramble about typography, writing, design, food, science, books, space, or pretty much anything. She can be bribed with sour candy. Follow Haley on Twitter @haleys_comma.

Kelly Turner is a Junior and Professional Writing major here at MSU. Writing, reading, and obsessing over TV shows and books are how she likes to spend her time. She believes peace, love, and reading are all we need. She loves website development and environmental science, and if you can’t tell, she’s a huge nerd. She’d also like to die peacefully in a bath of peanut butter and chocolate. Follow Kelly on Twitter @wordscreateus.

Leading this creative bunch is Casey Miles, PhD student in Rhetoric & Writing, with a master’s degree in Digital Rhetoric & Professional Writing. Casey’s research focuses on queer rhetorics, specifically looking at butch ways of knowing, doing, and being in academic spaces, as well as documentary and video composition. Casey continues to work on her documentary series, The Gender Project, which explores gender, gender identity, and sexuality in everyday lives.  Follow her on Twitter @soulsmiles.

From The Verge: University of California wants to let you read all its peer-reviewed work

Starting November 1st, all peer-reviewed work published by scholars working within The University of California system will be available for free on the university’s eScholarship website. This is a big move toward open access publishing, and comes in the wake of Aaron Swartz’s death as he was on trial for “illegally” attempting to do exactly what UC is starting. An interesting caveat to this move is that scholars can opt-out on a per paper basis. Read more at The Verge.

Swoon! Interactive Gantt Charts

For all you organization geeks (like myself), go-getters who like to plan ahead, frequent group collaborators, and anybody who just appreciates the beauty of a Gantt chart, I give you TeamWeek, a web and iOS interactive Gantt chart. TeamWeek has a pretty simple interface, yet it’s not so simple that it’s boring. Think the colorful drag-and-drop interface of Google Calendar, or even iCal, yet flipped so time stretches horizontally rather than vertically; and tasks are arranged by team member instead of day. And for my Gantt chart geeks, imagine a chart where you can move dates and times without having to redo the whole dang thing!! Whew I think I need a cigarette.

Source: Lifehacker